What to Expect in your Third Trimester of Pregnancy

Good day good people. I hope this blog post finds you well the in the midst of the off- brand that is this pandemic. Any who. Me and my really close girl friend had a long conversation over the phone a few weeks back and we discussed and compared our pregnancies. We talked about the ups and downs we shared and had in common. Then, I thought, you know what an expecting mother would enjoy this conversation. I say that because *raises voice* NOBODY told me about the ugly side of pregnancy. So if you’re here and you are expecting or want to be expecting, let me tell you the things folks like to keep to themselves. My pregnancy was all happy happy joy joy until the third trimester. If, you’ve already carried and given birth, nor worries stay, and read because I know you’ll be able to relate.

ugly- adj|unpleasant or repulsive, especially in appearance

Don’t want to read, No problem! Check out the Youtube video Below.

My Story:

I gave birth via C- Section to a handsome bouncing baby boy. He literally gave me life as I gave him life. We’ve had this equal give and take relationship ever for the last 6 months, and I wouldn’t trade it for the world. Carrying him was a beautiful experience I will cherish for the rest of my life. In comparison, I had a pretty smooth pregnancy. My son didn’t give me any trouble at all. But let’s cut the cute shit. Everything was all kicks and goo goo ga ga’s until the third trimester.

When I blew up like a balloon, so went my patience. The closer and closer we got to the end, I remember saying, its time for him to either move out or start paying rent because my boy was getting rather heavy. It’s all love, but nonetheless, there’s an ugly side to pregnancy that needs to be addressed.

6 Ugly parts of Pregnancy in the third trimester

  1. Nose spreading. By the time I was in my second trimester my nose had become a wide as my mouth, or at least that’s how I remember it. It’s a natural part of pregnancy, however, having a sausage nose does not please the mother.
  2. A Pain in the Ribs. Something happened towards the end. I think it was the way my son was positioned. In fact he was laying horizontally in the womb for the longest time. I can’t prove it, but I’m almost certain he used my rib as a pillow. The closer and closer we got to the last trimester, I had a constant pain on my left rib toward the center of my chest. Without fail, my rib was throbbing in tender pain.
  3. Constant Urination. Sis, let me tell you something. Me and all the commodes had close personal relationships. It was ridiculous. In my last trimester I spend more time in the bathroom than I did getting rest. I kid you not. I was almost afraid to drink any fluids because I knew I’d have to go running to the bathroom. The gag is you have to drink a lot of fluids to help nurture the baby. It was my trips, no my extended stays at the bathroom that had me feeling like a true vessel. I mean that’s what us women ultimately are–vessels from the spirit world to the natural world. It was on the toilet letting out small tinkles for the umptheenth time that let me know the truth of my significant but insignificant part of the whole process.
  4. He was getting on my nerves. Real talk, my son was on my nerves. The way he was laying tapped onto some nerves causing my legs to feel funny all the time. I’ll try to describe it. It was a tinglingly discomfort that ran down the side of my leg. It made sleeping and sometimes walking very uncomfortable. That’s the thing about the last trimester and pregnancy at large, slowly, but surely you lose your ability to do normal things. For example, walking across campus to my classroom became a real live chore. My classroom at the time was in the trailers and the trailers were a little walk aways from the main building. The gag is the distance started out being a brisk quick walk, but shortly became a walk from California to DC. I was walking countries worth of distances ya’ll, and pregnancy and that nerve in my leg did not let me forget it.
  5. Kicking and Moving. Don’t look at me like that! Sure, when my baby first kicked I wanted to record every moment. I could not wait for the first time he would kick. We were waiting at the door, don’t get me wrong. It was all kicks and giggles, pun intended, when he first started. I would even count them. Well, you have to monitor how often the baby kicks and how much in order to make sure the baby is doing well, and I did my job. And rightfully so, my son’s kicks reassured me and filled me with joy, but to keep it hot there were many days and LATE NIGHTS where I swear my little man was in my belly building an airplane or typing up a business plan. Cute kicks quickly became flips and turns in the wee hours of the morning that disrupted my sleep with no remorse. After a while, I felt like he was taking over my body completely. Soon, he would have access to my brain and control my every moment. In sum, yes kicking we love it. We need it. We monitor the movement. We need the moment. We are thankful for the movement. But I’d be a lie if I said that sometimes those moments were uncomfortable.
  6. Lack of sleep. Those last few weeks of pregnancy were uncomfortable. After all, I was a walking house. I literally housed this precious infant that would soon come into the world and bless us with his smiling face, coos, and innocence, and I was excited. However, most of the last trimester I could not sleep and here’s why. First of all, the doctors discourage you from sleeping on your back. You can sleep on your stomach, so your last hope is to sleep on your side. In fact, sleeping on your side is the recommendation. But imagine all this new weight falling on your side in conjunction with the already present nerve discomfort and a constant need to use the bathroom. I’ll tell you those things combined equal’s no sleep for mom. The gag is you need sleep to have the energy to to bake the baby. There’s no winning.
  7. BONUS: Being tired all the time. At any point of the day, and I mean any, I could fall asleep. Imagine being in a staff meeting after a long day of work in a semi-comfy auditorium reclining chair. Imagine falling asleep and not knowing. Imagine, then understanding the best way to sleep is sitting up. Imagine then trying to sleep sitting up that night. Then, imagine your butt losing all hope and your butt bone taking the brunt of the work. Yep. That’s pregnancy. That’s the last trimester.

In summary

Women carrying now, carrying later, or carried in the past–we all deserve a freaking medal. It’s hard working carrying a life. In fact, while pregnant I read that women who are carrying use the same about of energy as someone actively running a marathon. A MARATHON. Ya’ll this is no easy task. And I share my experience at this point because Mother’s day is coming up and you people, yes you people, need to understand the heavy lifting mother’s undergo to give live.

We do it. We love. We give relentlessly–even our bodies, but it is not easy. Let those cute posts fool you if you want. Motherhood is no easy thing, for that reason we, women deserve a lot more love, compassion, and understanding.

That said, pat yourself on the back sis. Not only did you carry that life, but you continue to love and nurture it all while dominating in your careers and business. We see you holding it down. We see you being strong. And we thank you for all you do here at Being Classic.

Happy Mother’s day!

Pay HOmage:

“When I get up and work out, I’m working out just as much for my girls as I am for me, because I want them to see a mother who loves them dearly, who invests in them, but who also invests in herself. It’s just as much about letting them know as young women that it is OK to put yourself a little higher on your priority list.”

—Michelle Obama

Facts:

  1. Carrying a baby is not easy, that’s why God gave the job to women.
  2. Pregnancy is a beautiful experience, but the third trimester is a doosy.
  3. Thank your momma.

Salute:

Thanks for reading! I really appreciate you visiting my corner of the internet.

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